wonder-woman2

On Friday December 9 at 7:30 I will launch my new book, Fatima’s Touch: Poems and Stories of the Prophet’s Daughter, Ruhaniat Press, 2016 at the beautiful Edgehill Mansion on the Dominican Campus in San Rafael. Because her story is almost completely unknown, and FATIMA is a famous, beloved woman in many countries in the world, I want to tell her stories, and share them with those of another famous forgotten woman, Charmain London, a Sonoma County legend, wife of writer Jack London. Iris Jamahl Dunkle, the current Poet Laureate of Sonoma County has just finished a biography on Charmain London and will share the evening with me. Please join us!

flyer- Famous Forgotten Women

Antiphon Poetry Magazine just wrote me: “We are delighted to accept [my new double sonnet]’Nurse’s Day,’ for Issue Nineteen, which will be published in the autumn.”

Wise daughter of the daughter of the Prophet…
…Oh Zaynab, legendary nurse— please hand
me lidocaine, a hypodermic and
some tweezers, sterile bandages. Dust is thick.
Assad’s war is beyond sane narrative… 

                        From Nurse’s Day

They wrote: “We’re thrilled that the British Library wishes to include Antiphon in a new open access archive of poetry websites/mags in the UK.”

From an introduction to a poem in my new book, honoring Sayyida Zaynab, “Over Damascus:”

“Over a decade ago, I visited The Shrine of Sayyida Zaynab (granddaughter of Prophet Muhammad) in the suburbs of Damascus. It seemed like the well-in-the-desert for women, a place we could all feel empowered.

Recently, it was under attack twice, caught in the crosshairs of the Syrian conflict. The regime that the terrorists are trying to overthrow is “Alawi.” The name comes from “Ali,” although they are an independent Muslim group. This is a very important shrine in Damascus. Opponents of the Syrian Regime would like to demolish it.

n00037837-r-s-011_2

Zaynab is the patron saint of the nurses of Syria, because she was at Karbala when her brother, Husayn and many others were killed. She stood up to the tyrant Yazid, as mentioned in this poem, written before the recent attacks.”

 

Advertisements